Dipole moment units converter
Converts dipole moment from one unit to another e.g. from debyes to atomic units or vice versa.

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Symbolic algebra

ⓘ Hint: This calculator supports symbolic math. You can enter numbers, but also symbols like a, b, pi or even whole math expressions such as (a+b)/2. If you still don't sure how to make your life easier using symbolic algebra check out our another page: Symbolic calculations

Inputs data - value and unit, which we're going to convert#

Value
Unit
Decimals

#

SI#

UnitSymbolSymbol
(plain text)
Value as symbolicValue as numericNotesUnit conversion formula
coulomb gigameterShow sourceC×GmC \times GmC × GmShow source...\text{...}-The derived unit of dipole moment created by multiplying electric charge unit coulomb (1 C) and length unit gigameter (1 Gm).1 C×Gm=109 C×m1\ C \times Gm = 10^9\ C \times mShow source......
coulomb megameterShow sourceC×MmC \times MmC × MmShow source...\text{...}-The derived unit of dipole moment created by multiplying electric charge unit coulomb (1 C) and length unit megameter (1 Mm).1 C×Mm=106 C×m1\ C \times Mm = 10^6\ C \times mShow source......
coulomb kilometerShow sourceC×kmC \times kmC × kmShow source...\text{...}-The derived unit of dipole moment created by multiplying electric charge unit coulomb (1 C) and length unit kilometer (1 km).1 C×km=1000 C×m1\ C \times km = 1000\ C \times mShow source......
coulomb meterShow sourceC×mC \times mC × mShow source...\text{...}-The basic unit of dipole moment in the SI system. One coulomb times a meter corresponds to a dipole moment occurring between two opposing point charges of one coulomb (1 C), located at a distance of one meter (1 m).Show source......
coulomb decimeterShow sourceC×dmC \times dmC × dmShow source...\text{...}-The derived unit of dipole moment created by multiplying electric charge unit coulomb (1 C) and length unit decimeter (1 dm).1 C×dm=0.1 C×m1\ C \times dm = 0.1\ C \times mShow source......
coulomb centimeterShow sourceC×cmC \times cmC × cmShow source...\text{...}-The derived unit of dipole moment created by multiplying electric charge unit coulomb (1 C) and length unit centimeter (1 cm).1 C×cm=0.01 C×m1\ C \times cm = 0.01\ C \times mShow source......
coulomb milimeterShow sourceC×mmC \times mmC × mmShow source...\text{...}-The derived unit of dipole moment created by multiplying electric charge unit coulomb (1 C) and length unit milimeter (1 mm).1 C×mm=0.001 C×m1\ C \times mm = 0.001\ C \times mShow source......
coulomb micrometerShow sourceC×μmC \times \mu mC × µmShow source...\text{...}-The derived unit of dipole moment created by multiplying electric charge unit coulomb (1 C) and length unit micrometer (1 μm).1 C×μm=106 C×m1\ C \times \mu m = 10^{-6}\ C \times mShow source......
coulomb nanometerShow sourceC×nmC \times nmC × nmShow source...\text{...}-The derived unit of dipole moment created by multiplying electric charge unit coulomb (1 C) and length unit nanometer (1 nm).1 C×nm=109 C×m1\ C \times nm = 10^{-9}\ C \times mShow source......
coulomb angstromShow sourceC×A˚C \times \text{Å}C × ÅShow source...\text{...}-The derived unit of dipole moment created by multiplying electric charge unit coulomb (1 C) and length unit angstrem (1 Å).1 C×A˚=1010 C×m1\ C \times \text{Å} = 10^{-10}\ C \times mShow source......
coulomb nanometerShow sourceC×pmC \times pmC × pmShow source...\text{...}-The derived unit of dipole moment created by multiplying electric charge unit coulomb (1 C) and length unit picometer (1 pm).1 C×pm=1012 C×m1\ C \times pm = 10^{-12}\ C \times mShow source......
coulomb femtometerShow sourceC×fmC \times fmC × fmShow source...\text{...}-The derived unit of dipole moment created by multiplying electric charge unit coulomb (1 C) and length unit femtometer (1 fm).1 C×fm=1015 C×m1\ C \times fm = 10^{-15}\ C \times mShow source......
coulomb attometerShow sourceC×amC \times amC × amShow source...\text{...}-The derived unit of dipole moment created by multiplying electric charge unit coulomb (1 C) and length unit attometer (1 am).1 C×am=1018 C×m1\ C \times am = 10^{-18}\ C \times mShow source......

Chemistry and atomic physics#

UnitSymbolSymbol
(plain text)
Value as symbolicValue as numericNotesUnit conversion formula
debyeShow sourceDDDShow source...\text{...}-Unit of dipole moment derived from the centimeter-gram-second system (CGS). One debye corresponds to a dipole moment occurring between two charges of one ten billionth franklin (10-10 Fr) separated by distance of one agstrem (1 Å). Although the CGS system has been displaced by SI units, the debye unit is still often used in atomic physics and to determine the dipole moment of chemical molecules. This fact has purely practical reasons, because most chemical molecules have a dipole moment within range 0-11 debyes.1 D=1010 FrA˚3.335641030 C m1\ D = 10^{-10}\ Fr \cdot \text{Å} \approx 3.33564 \cdot 10^{−30}\ C\ \cdot mShow source......
atomic unit of electric dipole momentShow sourceauauauShow source...\text{...}-Unit of dipole moment often used in quantum-mechanical calculations. One atomic unit corresponds to a dipole moment between two elementary charges (e) spaced apart by a distance of one Bohr radius (a0).1au=ea08.47835362551030 Cm1 au = e \cdot a_0 \approx 8.478 353 6255 \cdot 10^{-30}\ C \cdot mShow source......

Some facts#

  • The electric dipole moment for a system consisting of two or more point charges is defined as the below sum:
    p=i=1...nqiri\overrightarrow{p} = \sum_{i=1...n}{q_i \overrightarrow{r_i}}
    where:
    • p\overrightarrow{p} - electric dipole moment of the whole system,
    • ri\overrightarrow{r_i} - a vector pointing to the i-th electric charge,
    • qiq_i - value of i-th charge,
    • nn - number of charges in the system.
  • Dipole moment is a vector.
  • The dipole moment makes sense for neutral systems, i.e. where the sum of all charges is zero:
    i=1...nqi=0\sum_{i=1...n}{q_i} = 0
  • The unit of electric dipole moment in SI system is coulomb times meter:
    CmC \cdot m
  • Another unit, used mainly by chemists and atomic physics, is 1 debye:
    1D=3,335641030Cm1 D = 3,33564 \cdot 10^{-30} C \cdot m
  • If the system with the dipole moment p\overrightarrow{p} is introduced into the external electric field E\overrightarrow{E}, then the moment of force will act on it is:
    M=p×E\overrightarrow{M} = \overrightarrow{p} \times \overrightarrow{E}
  • Molecules with non-zero dipole moment are called polar. An example of such a molecule is water (H2O H_2O).
  • If the electric charges in the system are evenly distributed, then the dipole moment of such a system is zero. Examples of such systems are chemical molecules with a symmetrical structure such as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 CCl_4). Such molecules are called apolar or non-polar.

How to convert#

  • Enter the number to field "value" - enter the NUMBER only, no other words, symbols or unit names. You can use dot (.) or comma (,) to enter fractions.
    Examples:
    • 1000000
    • 123,23
    • 999.99999
  • Find and select your starting unit in field "unit". Some unit calculators have huge number of different units to select from - it's just how complicated our world is...
  • And... you got the result in the table below. You'll find several results for many different units - we show you all results we know at once. Just find the one you're looking for.

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