Morse codes table
Table shows common Morse codes for letters, digits and selected special codes such as international SOS signal.

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Settings

Morse sound and light player settings
FrequencyHz
Number of words per minute
(reference to word PARIS, which is 50 dot long)

Latin alphabet letters

CharacterMorse codeAudio and light signal
A
•-
B
-•••
C
-•-•
D
-••
E
F
••-•
G
--•
H
••••
I
••
J
•---
K
-•-
L
•-••
M
--
N
-•
O
---
P
•--•
Q
--•-
R
•-•
S
•••
T
-
U
••-
V
•••-
W
•--
X
-••-
Y
-•--
Z
--••

Digits

CharacterMorse codeAudio and light signal
1
•----
2
••---
3
•••--
4
••••-
5
•••••
6
-••••
7
--•••
8
---••
9
----•
0
-----

Punctuation marks

CharacterMorse codeAudio and light signal
.
•-•-•-
,
--••--
'
•----•
"
•-••-•
_
••--•-
:
---•••
;
-•-•-•
?
••--••
!
-•-•--
-
-••••-
+
•-•-•
/
-••-•
(
-•--•
)
-•--•-
=
-•••-
@
•--•-•

Polish letters

CharacterMorse codeAudio and light signal
Ą
•-•-
Ć
-•-••
Ę
••-••
CH
-•-• ••••
Ł
•-••-
Ń
--•--
Ó
---•
Ś
•••-•••
Ż
--••-•
Ź
--••-

Procedure signs (so-called prosigns)

SignalMorse codeAudio and light signalEquivalent voice messageNote
AA
•-•-
UNKNOWN STATIONUsed for directional signaling lights (e.g. on sea), but not in radiotelegraphy.
AR
•-•-•
OUTEnd of transmission, end of message or end of telegram.
AS
•-•••
WAIT"I must pause for a few minutes." or "I am engaged in a contact with another station (that you do not hear), please wait quietly."
BT
-•••-
BREAKStart new section of message.
CT
-•-•-
-Start of transmission or start of new message.
HH
••••••••
CORRECTIONPreceding text was in error. The following is the corrected text.
INT
••-•-
INTERROGATIVEMilitary replacement for the question mark (?) abbreviation. When placed before a signal, modifies the signal to be a question/request.
KA
-•-•-
-Message begins, start of work or new message. Starting signal that precedes every transmission.
KN
-•--•
-Invitation for named station to transmit.
NJ
-••---
-Shift to Wabun code, which is Japanese adaptation of Morse.
SK
•••-•-
-End of contact or end of work.
SN
•••-•
-Understood / verified.
SOS
•••---•••
-Start of distress signal. Only used by original message sender, and only for imminent danger to life or property.
VE
•••-•
VERIFIEDMessage is verified.

Well-known abbreviations

AbbreviationMorse codeAudio and light signalEquivalent voice messageNote
DE
-•• •
THIS IS FROMUsed to precede the name or other identification of the calling station.
NIL
-• •• •-••
NOTHING HEARDGeneral-purpose response to any request or inquiry for which the answer is "nothing", "none" or "not available". Also means "I have no messages for you."
R
•-•
ROGERMeans the last transmission has been received in technical sense, but does not indicate the message was understood or will be complied with.
K
-•-
OVERInvitation to transmit after terminating the call signal.
CL
-•-• •-••
CLOSINGAnnouncing station shutdown.
CQ
-•-• --•-
-General call to any station.
CP
-•-• •--•
-General call to two or more specified stations.
CS
-•-• •••
-Means "what is the name or identity signal of your station?"
QRS
--•- •-• •••
SPEAK SLOWER"Please speak slower".
WA
•-- •-
WORD AFTER"The portion of the message to which I refer is the single word that follows the text ..."
WB
•-- -•••
WORD BEFORE"The portion of the message to which I refer is the sigle word that precedes the text ..."
AA
•- •-
ALL AFTER"The portion of the message to which I refer is all that follows the text ..."
AB
•- -•••
ALL BEFORE"The portion of the message to which I refer is all that precedes the text ..."
BN
-••• -•
ALL BETWEEN"The portion of the message to which I refer is all that falls between ... and ..."
?
••--••
SAY AGAINWhen standing alone, a note of interrogation or request for repetition of a transmission not understood. When ? is placed after a signal, modifies the signal to be a question or request.
C
-•-•
CORRECT / AFFIRMATIVE"Answer to prior question is yes".
N
-•
NEGATIVE"Answer to prior question is no".
ZWF
--•• •-- ••-•
WRONG"Your last transmission was wrong. The correct version is ..."
QTR?
--•- - •-• ••--••
REQUEST TIME CHECK"Time-check request" or "What is the correct time?".
Time is always UTC, unless explicitly requested otherwise, e.g. QTR HST?)
QTR
--•- - •-•
TIME"The following is the correct UTC in HHMM 24-hour format ..."
BK
-••• -•-
BREAK-INSignal used to interrupt a transmission already in progress. In military networks TTTT prosign is used instead.
CFM
-•-• ••-• --
I ACKNOWLEDGEThe same as R (ROGER). Means "message received".
WX
•-- -••-
-"Weather report follows ..."
INTERCO
•• -• - • •-• -•-• ---
INTERCO"International Code of Signals groups follow ..."

Some facts

  • Morse Code allows you to send a text message using a series of pulses of varying duration.
  • The message in the Morse code consists of:
    • short pulses - so-called dots,
    • long pulses - so-called dashes, it is assumed that one dash should last at least as much as three dots,
    • silence - no impulse for a time corresponding to three dots means the end of the character (letters, numbers etc.), a break lasting as many as seven dots marks the end of a word.
  • The Morse alphabet is a theoretical concept, i.e. it does not specify how to physically send impulses to receiver and vice versa. Depending on the possibilities and demand, impulses can be sent, e.g. using:
    • electrical impulses,
    • light pulses (e.g. during communication at sea),
    • gestures of the body (e.g. spread arms mean a dash, arms raised up a dot),
    • etc.
  • Morse code is case insensitive. This means that e.g. letters A and a will be coded in the same way.
  • The device that uses electrical impulses to send Morse code is telegraph.
  • A special sequence of impulses in the Morse code is the international SOS emergency signal, which means a call for help . The SOS signal consists of three short then three long pulses and then three short again. This makes it easy to remember and during repeated transmissions, it doesn't matter if we start with short or long pulses, e.g. as a result of a mistake.
  • If you want to see what your message looks like in Morse code or you have the message you need to decode, check out our other calculator: Morse code translator.

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